Multimodal short story: ‘These Memories Won’t Last’

This week's link is to a beautifully realised, multimodal short story by Australian illustrator, interactive designer and writer, Sutu (Stuart Campbell). 'These Memories Won't Last' explores the fragility of the human mind, changing family relationships and the impact of dementia by using the story interface to replicate the vanishing of memory over time. As you scroll through the images and read the panels, they gently fade away; there is no scrolling back, so readers are at the mercy of their own memories as the cells dissolve. It's a great story to promote discussion of the way we tell stories, the fleeting nature of memories and the influence of interactivity and technology on storytelling. Suitable for Years 9–12.

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Stan Grant, Australia Day and Indigenous identity

An interesting thing happened just before Australia Day 2016: a speech on the topic 'Racism is destroying the Australian dream' delivered by Stan Grant, almost three months earlier, went viral. You may have seen the coverage and watched Grant's speech, but you may not have heard him explore the ideas he addressed at length. The Guardian Australia's Token Podcast, which explores issues of race and cultural identity in Australia, featured Grant on 16 December 2015, expanding on the issues that he raised in his speech the month prior. Not only does Grant's powerful voice offer a passionate and articulate point of view, his speech and its belated media coverage raise issues about the role that timing and context can have on the apparent media-worthy nature of a text, event or person. Suitable for Years 10–12.

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Bad banter: the gendered language of students

The first resource we'd like to discuss this year is an opinion piece published in The Age this January: 'Young men learn boundaries in well-prepared schools'. Written by secondary school teacher Emily Hehir, it discusses the gender discrimination she has experienced from male students, and the wider social implications of this behaviour. It raises pertinent questions about respect and authority by describing situations that will be familiar to both teachers and students. Suitable for Years 10–12.

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